Kriss Kross, part II

I can’t believe I forgot to put this up here. I made another crossword puzzle a few weeks ago, something to keep kids busy while I was subbing for middle school study hall.

On one side of the page I copied a handout on the 12 (but really 14) Olympians. I forgot to include Hestia, dernnit. Maybe I’ll update it at some point to include her. On the other was the crossword. For some reason, middle schoolers really love crosswords. Go figure. Downloads after the jump.

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Latin Mad Libs!

Sometimes it’s hard to get students engaged.

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Especially when in Latin class.

Taking inspiration from Mad Libs, and adapting a passage from Ecce Romani, I made what I think is a fun activity to help students practice noun-adjective agreement.  The passage is from chapter 5, but the activity actually correlates better with chapter 6.  Chapter 5’s story was just more entertaining.

Students fill in blanks to prompts such as “masc nom sing,” meaning a masculine nominative singular adjective.  They then plug in these adjectives into the story and translate.  Comedy ensues!  Grammar is practiced.  Download after the jump.

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Make like a tree, and get outta here.

Example:

Gillian decided it was time to turn over a new _______ and forget her past mistakes.

Why don’t you take a _______ out of Simon’s book and start helping.

Autumn came suddenly and the first _______ had fallen before August had even ended.

Answer: leaf

Our friend Tim gives us this great lesson plan on how words can be used in different ways. Many ESL students get confused by these multi-tasking words. I mean, how do you tell the difference between “He leaves,” and “The leaves fell”? Tim recommends using gapped sentences to help students use context clues to decipher just that. I’ll probably be using this in my ESL classroom in the next few weeks.

Speaking of leaves…

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